28 April 2009

Country as brand, product, and beyond: A place marketing and brand management

Country as brand, product, and beyond: A place marketing and brand management...
Philip Kotler; David Gertner
Journal of Brand Management; Apr 2002; 9, 4/5; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 249

Marketing Local Identity

Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 2, No. 1, 1997 35

BILL ERICKSON & MARION ROBERTS

ABSTRACT:

This paper reports on a research project into city identity, city marketing
and the implications for urban design. Identity can refer to those aspects which make a place identifiable, or unique but can also refer to the way individuals or groups identify with a place. A common view today is that uniform concepts of planning and development together with the 'commodification' of places has led to the loss of localized identity. However, it now appears that the increased pressure on city managers to compete for investment and 'market' their locality has led to a renewed interest in local difference. Creating a sense of identity is essential for successfully generating economic activity and urban marketing. The act of identification of and identification with a new place and new life style are important expectations of new and existing residents.
Despite this the promotional material produced by various cities is remarkably similar and demonstrates a desegregated and thematic attitude to place. The images exhibited in this material suggest diversity within rather than between cities. The logic of urban marketing describes the city as a series of themed attributes each offering a particular amenity with an associated image and urban form. As urban management moves closer to urban marketing the city will become increasingly fragmented into discrete stereotypical pieces with a thematic rather than spatial relationship.

16 April 2009

Tourism marketing images of industrial cities

Tourism marketing images of industrial cities

Bill BramwellE-mail The Corresponding Author, a, * and Liz Rawdingb, **

a Principal Lecturer in Tourism, Sheffield Hallam University Totley, Sheffield S17 4AB, UK

b Researcher at the Center for Tourism, Sheffield Hallam University (Totley, Sheffield S17 4AB, UK

Received 12 April 1994;
revised 21 November 1994;
accepted 27 March 1995;
Refereed anonymously Coordinating Editor: Carlton S. Van Doren
Available online 26 February 1999.

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which, and why, places project either similar or different images in their tourism marketing. Specific consideration is given to the similarities and differences in the place images for tourism marketing used by five old industrial English cities: Birmingham, Bradford, Manchester, Sheffield, and Stoke-on-Trent. It is found that, while there was some standardization in their overall marketing imagery, there were also significant differences. Consideration is also given to some of the influences shaping the images projected by these cities using insights from geographical studies, marketing, and critical sociology. An integrated, multidisciplinary research agenda is outlined for future work on city tourism images.

15 April 2009

ACR/Sheth Foundation Dissertation Grants for Topics in Cross-Cultural and Public Purpose Consumer Research

2009 ACR/Sheth Foundation Dissertation Grants for Topics in Cross-Cultural
and Public Purpose Consumer Research

1. The purpose of these grants is to support the data collection efforts of new dissertations or those in the preliminary stages of development; awards are designed for dissertation projects initiated in academic year 2008-2009 and designed for completion in 2009-2010.

2. Eligible dissertation topics can deal with any aspect of (1) cross-cultural or global consumer behavior or (2) the public purpose of consumer research, which includes studies of social marketing issues or transformative consumer research as related to individual, family, societal, or ecological well-being. Topics in the public purpose track can range from bright-side issues in consumer behavior (e.g., voluntary simplicity, environmentally efficacious behaviors, healthy eating, possession sharing/communal consumption, household saving and retirement, exercise) to dark-side issues in consumer behavior (e.g., addictions, crime, homelessness, poverty, excessive gambling, credit card debt, obesity), and also include other general subjects such as financial literacy, health care decision making, product safety, computer entertainment and virtual reality, elderly consumers, and
handicapped consumers.

3. Ph.D. candidates at the post-comprehensive exam, dissertation stage should submit proposals after June 1, 2009 but no later than June 26, 2009.

4. Proposals must be submitted as Word attachments via e-mail to Professor David Mick (McIntire School of Commerce, University of Virginia) at dmick@virginia.edu

5. There is a firm limit for proposals of 12 double-spaced pages, including references and all tables/figures (12-point font and one-inch margins). The first page should include the title and abstract but no author information.

6. The proposal should describe the research objectives, overview the proposed methodology, and specify anticipated contributions.

7. Proposals are to be e-mailed with a cover letter from the applicant's dissertation advisor. Please include e-mail and regular mail addresses for both the applicant and advisor. Also, the cover letter must specify the track in which the proposal is to be judged either the cross-cultural/global track or the public purpose track.

8. A committee of consumer behavior scholars will evaluate the proposals and make selection decisions. Standard selection criteria will be invoked importance, sophistication, rigor, etc.). Particular emphasis will be placed on whether the proposed research addresses important and exciting questions about either of the two general topic areas described above.

9. Awardees will be selected and notified in August 2009. Funds will be discharged shortly thereafter. Awardees will also receive a plaque at the ACR Annual North American Conference in October 2009.

10. The only stipulation in accepting this award is that the recipients acknowledge the financial contribution of the Sheth Foundation in any forthcoming publications extending from the grant.

11. Please address questions to David Mick by e-mail via dmick@virginia.edu

13 April 2009

"Conscious Capitalism"

Subject: Academic conference on "Conscious Capitalism"

Raj Sisodia and R. Edward Freeman would like to invite business doctoral students to attend the first academic conference on this topic: Conceptualizing Conscious Capitalism® Thursday and Friday, May 28 and 29, 2009 BENTLEY UNIVERSITY Waltham, Massachusetts Building on the resounding success of the first practitioner-centric conference called Catalyzing Conscious Capitalism® in Austin in November 2008, this gathering of thought leaders will lay the intellectual and conceptual foundations of the field, and identify key research questions. It will feature two days of presentations by leading thinkers on the fundamentals of business definition, purpose and stakeholder orientation. The term “conscious capitalism” reflects the fact that more people today are at higher levels of consciousness about themselves and the world around them than ever before. This is due in part to natural evolution, but also to the rapid aging of society, which has resulted in a higher proportion of people in mid-life and beyond, when consciousness is raised and higher-level needs predominate. The advent of the World Wide Web has accelerated this trend, simultaneously connecting hundreds of millions of people and placing great demands for transparency on companies. Our definition of conscious capitalism has three key elements: -companies have a purpose that transcends profit maximization; -companies are managed for the benefit of all stakeholders in their ecosystem, not just shareholders; and -companies are led by spiritually evolved, self-effacing servant leaders. Companies that practice conscious capitalism embody the idea that profit and prosperity go hand in hand with social justice and environmental stewardship. They operate with a systems view, recognizing and benefiting from the connectedness and interdependence of all stakeholders. They tap into deeper sources of positive energy and create greater value for all stakeholders. They utilize creative business models that are both transformational and inspirational, and can help solve the world’s many social and environmental problems. Many progressive CEOs consider business schools to be part of the problem, in that they continue to inculcate a mindset in future business leaders that is highly adversarial in nature, puts profits ahead of any other nobler purpose, and treats shareholder interests as paramount and all other stakeholders as merely means to that end. Whether this is true or not, we strongly believe that business academics must be part of the solution. They must lead the way in conducting research on how best to align private business interests with larger societal concerns. They must educate students about how they can create and run businesses that operate on a higher plane of consciousness, which can see the essential interconnectedness across stakeholders, and which exist in order to serve a higher purpose that energizes, elevates and aligns all stakeholders. Join us at the beginning of this exciting journey, as we set out to show how business can indeed be a noble pursuit, how it can exist comfortably and profitably on the right side of society, how it can embody qualities such as caring and love without being decimated by ruthless and single-minded competitors, and how it can spread healing and joy all around without exploitation of any kind. For more information: www.bentley.edu/conscious-capitalism

--MRKT-PHD--

Moderators:
Rishtee Kumar
Ben Lawrence

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10 April 2009

Tourism marketing images of industrial cities

Bill BramwellE-mail The Corresponding Author, a, * and Liz Rawdingb, **

a Principal Lecturer in Tourism, Sheffield Hallam University Totley, Sheffield S17 4AB, UK

b Researcher at the Center for Tourism, Sheffield Hallam University (Totley, Sheffield S17 4AB, UK

Received 12 April 1994;
revised 21 November 1994;
accepted 27 March 1995;
Refereed anonymously Coordinating Editor: Carlton S. Van Doren
Available online 26 February 1999.

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which, and why, places project either similar or different images in their tourism marketing. Specific consideration is given to the similarities and differences in the place images for tourism marketing used by five old industrial English cities: Birmingham, Bradford, Manchester, Sheffield, and Stoke-on-Trent. It is found that, while there was some standardization in their overall marketing imagery, there were also significant differences. Consideration is also given to some of the influences shaping the images projected by these cities using insights from geographical studies, marketing, and critical sociology. An integrated, multidisciplinary research agenda is outlined for future work on city tourism images.


Author Keywords: tourism place images; urban tourism; place marketing; place image differentiationimages touristiques d'endroits; tourisme urbain; marketing des endroits; différenciation d'images
Article Outline

• References

* Bramwell's research interests include tourism, planning, sustainable tourism management, rural and urban tourism. He is co-editor of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism.

** Rawding's research is in the fields of urban tourism and place marketing.

Special issue in European Planning Studies Spatial planning and place branding: rethinking relations and synergies

Introduction:  Kristof Van Assche, Raoul Beunen and Eduardo Oliveira  Rethinking planning-branding relations: an introduction . https:...